vaults & occuli, take 2

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In typical fashion, a synthetic plan was due: taking the vault from yesterday’s post (my take on Lutyen’s take on Soane’s take on antiquity), I slapped a half-round colonnades on either end covered each in a large conical shingled roof.  The fun part is the cornice of the cubic vaulted form, which does some funky things to accommodate modules, structure, and walls, shown in the bottom drawing (wormseye axonometric detail).  The lantern is a direct quote of the lighthouse lantern at Old Point Loma in San Diego.

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a dutch gable folly

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Part gable, part hip roof: the dutch gable.  This small pavilion is a simple post-and-beam structure, on a four-square plan, with shingled walls set in antis to the columns on two sides, all beneath a large square dutch gable roof.  The roof is inherently directional, always favoring one axis of the other, even though the eaves remain constant.  The bottom drawings attempt to subvert this, making the dutch gable diagonally symmetrical, similar to the roof of a small cabin I featured some weeks past.

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shingles and palladio

 

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A Palladian villa facade on the primary axis is countered with long, low shingled porches on the transverse, which in a twist of irony is where the entry is located.  Behind a symmetrical elevation of colonnades and porticoes, the building takes a more free spirit – one porch is exterior, the other ‘enclosed’, a glass-wrapped stair hall occupies two of three bays of a frontal portico, while the left over bay is screened in.  The shingled roofs of the porches extend to meet a long skylit lightwell, cutting the central Palladian volume in twain.

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shingles, circles, and squares

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This beach cottage betrays symmetry while remaining rigorously modular.  A tower surmounts the concave entry aedicule, a large half-round stair walled in glass block curves back into the square living room, where a circular bay window contrast with the entry, and a long porch is added onto the otherwise square, hip-roofed volume.

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bruce price goes diagonal

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In a seeming break with the previous two Price projects that were relentlessly symmetrical and modular.  This project would seem to diverge – seem to.  The reality is that this cottage is just as systematic as the previous two, but its symmetry is diagonal rather than axial, and its modularity is only shifted one half bay to turn a regular square plan into a rectangular one.  The ground floor is all ashlar cut stone, while shingles cover nearly everything else.  A large tower takes up one corner, where the ashlar rises up into the second story, even to the third at a small circular corner column – see wormseye axonometric below.  Rounded corners abound – a continuous wrapping surface of shingles consumes the rigid geometry.

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bruce price and dueling chimneys

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Once again, Price regulates the picturesque qualities of the Shingle Style on a strict module and with intense symmetry.  Two chimneys dominate the principal facade, which has a Richardsonian Syrian arch dead center, flanked with expansive glazing and shingled balconies on the sides, which top long portico-ed porches.  The symmetry only breaks at the entry facade, where a small porch sits next to the stair hall.

bruce price @ tuxedo park

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Today I’ll start a short series on four summer cottages located in Tuxedo Park, NY, by Bruce Price, who also designed numerous other buildings in the masterplanned community.  This cottage of 1886 takes the aesthetics of the Shingle Style, but meets them with a rigid modularity and symmetry.  More to come.

a bay window

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A bay window topped with a full-width gable, leaving small triangular soffits at the eaves.  I noticed this feature on my way to a site meeting in South Los Angeles, and since then have seen it recurring throughout my library – Richardson, Bruce Price, Peabody & Stearns, et al.  So here’s my version: covered in shingles throughout, battered stone walls at grade, four-square windows, the gable becomes a full pediment, and the big reveal – a rounded interior wall.

a beach cottage

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Taking cues from Shingle Style residences mixed with a fair amount of Richardson (red mortar on Flemish-bond brick and rough-faced ashlar masonry much?) and a bit of my own preferences for industrial sash windows and rigid geometries, this little cottage is organized around a nine-square plan, with cramped interior rooms and no central ‘Hall’, thereby favoring the large screened porch at the rear.

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shingles, squares, and circles

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Let’s start with the detail this time, reading top to bottom: 1.) A shingled wall curves in to meet a stucco wall in a re-entrant corner.  Square windows are cut from this, mullioned into the four-square, with small, beveled squares around.  2.) This shingle wall is the second story with a colonnade below, the stucco is an otherwise blank wall, with only one tall window cutting through the middle and terminating in a dormer at the roof.  3.) This tall window only hints at the circular interior volume behind, one side a stair, the other an entry.  Other than that, no record of the two wall systems is traced on the interior, where only the radius of the curve exists.  4.) And just like that, we’re back at the detail again.

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