another cabin-thing

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Continuing my exploration of rural agricultural form, this square cabin-like-structure plays on ideas of symmetry, complete and incomplete form, nine-square and four-square planning, all within the guise of simple vernacular architecture.  The side elevation was the generator, with an overall symmetrical gable, infilled below with a colonnade on one end, a blank wall on the other, and a large picture window on center.  The plan operates between the three bays of this side elevation and four running perpendicular, with a long vaulted living-sleeping room flanked by the porch-colonnade on one end and a long kitchen-toilet-service gallery opposite.  A study of potentially running a barrel vaulted ceiling the length of the main living hall is at the bottom.

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a barn, of sorts

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Taking cues from the myriad of agricultural and vernacular forms I spotted on my trip up Yosemite-way the other week, this small square structure features a prominent gable on two ends, with a raised, ventilated mini-gable at the center bay, and a lantern above that on the center bay.  The eaved sides are treated as small colonnades, with single doors running each length.

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half house

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While taking its name from one of John Hejduk’s many unbuilt projects, the One-Half House, this project offers a different interpretation of an architecture of halves.  One half-plan of Richardson meets one half-plan of Neutra.  The entry portico is recessed into the building line, and takes cues from some vernacular Angeleno tract homes from the 1930’s (concurrent with Neutra’s earlier formal explorations).  I do think that the stucco variation at the bottom is much more convincing than the overtly Richardsonian brick variant – but maybe it needs to be weaned of a little too much Krier (Miami, or Windsor).

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a garden gate

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Because even the most mundane of elements deserve to be thoughtfully and appropriately considered, I’m featuring a series of details and design considerations for a gate at my house, fronting a small garden courtyard.  Typical wood rails span brick piers, with a weighted chain closer to keep things tidy.

asymmetry in the country

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Today’s installment is something a little idiosyncratic – this one didn’t begin with a square, but rather a triangle.  From that, came a rotunda, and two arms, one of which I furnished with a square.  This project takes more precedence from the picturesque traditions, but is still rather rigorous in module and geometry.  References stem from Robert A M Stern to Samuel Vosper’s work with the Army Corps of Engineers and a touch of Lutyens.

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a market hall

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This is a collection of market types, with four ancient Greek stoae on the ground level, double stairs up to the second floor market halls, skylit, and further to the commodities trading levels within the tower.  An atrium spans between the four levels.  An enlarged plan of the entry lobby finishes the drawing set.

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a pool house

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A square with brick exterior walls, with a square pool in the center.  One half of the enclosure is fleshed out on the interior with modern details, while the other has a classical impluvium roof, but with the same sliding glass doors as the modern half.  An unfolded wormseye (upview) axonometric is below.

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a barn to live in

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Taking its form from some barn structures I passed on my trip to Oregon, this house has two opposing axes, one large gable, and a hip-ish roof.  A spiral stair gently curves out on the side opposite the main entry.  Classical details sit happily next to vernacular forms.  Further formal explorations below

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a porch house

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The parti is simple: two squares topped with a tall gable, surrounded by a wrap-around porch.  A skylit stair occupies the very center, flanked by hearths.  A semi-circular screened porch fills in one end, while an enclosed patio becomes a library at the other.

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