a dutch gable folly

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Part gable, part hip roof: the dutch gable.  This small pavilion is a simple post-and-beam structure, on a four-square plan, with shingled walls set in antis to the columns on two sides, all beneath a large square dutch gable roof.  The roof is inherently directional, always favoring one axis of the other, even though the eaves remain constant.  The bottom drawings attempt to subvert this, making the dutch gable diagonally symmetrical, similar to the roof of a small cabin I featured some weeks past.

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cabins & barns

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Following up on two themes from my northward journey, I’m giving you a look into two ideas, both alike in simplicity.  The Coast: a cabin, square with a large hip roof over a wrap-around porch, and elevations that need a good fleshing out.  Farmland: a barn, with deep eaves on three sides, enclosed in glass behind.

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a cabin

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Diagonally symmetrical, this small cabin type is a riff on the minimal, mid-century cabin we spent a week in on the Oregon coast.  The plan is four-square, with the living room occupying one corner, fully glazed, with the hearth as a corner-focused object: this is a direct quote of our cabin, down to the thin-gauge blackened steel hearth.  The rest of the plan stems from this single move, with the circular stair opposite, a study and kitchen flanking.  The roof runs a single gable along the diagonal toward the living room, but tapers back into a typical hip for the two other facades.

basilican explorations

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As I was writing this post a few weeks ago, I found the plan to be once again worthy of some further reflection and thought – precisely the nine-square plan, with a hybrid basilica and greek cross interior volume, the four empty corners filled with circular forms (bathrooms and stairs) encased in heavy poche, and all of it wrapped in a brick Richardsonian wrapper under a singularly simple red tile hip roof.  The bottom iteration was the first, while I was still wrangling the plan into a perfect nine-square.

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bruce price goes diagonal

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In a seeming break with the previous two Price projects that were relentlessly symmetrical and modular.  This project would seem to diverge – seem to.  The reality is that this cottage is just as systematic as the previous two, but its symmetry is diagonal rather than axial, and its modularity is only shifted one half bay to turn a regular square plan into a rectangular one.  The ground floor is all ashlar cut stone, while shingles cover nearly everything else.  A large tower takes up one corner, where the ashlar rises up into the second story, even to the third at a small circular corner column – see wormseye axonometric below.  Rounded corners abound – a continuous wrapping surface of shingles consumes the rigid geometry.

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two squares, unalike.

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Juxtapositions: the first square is further development of a project I featured some time ago, where the square is the internal volume (indeed cubic in it’s section), but flanked on two ends with large masonry walls that curve in to the entrances, and again to form corner towers, while opening to full-height glazed opening on the sides.  The second square is a study of differing systems, where the primary axis is four-square, and the secondary is nine-square, all topped with a shallow central dome.

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of all the burger joints in all the world

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I was waiting in the drive-thru line at that iconic California burger stand when I began to think of all the ways that the concrete masonry building was banal.  And yet, with a few interesting moments – the angled drive-up windows, for instance.  My proposal takes that window and wraps it over the entire rear of the building, Mies-like, allowing customers in the car to watch their burgers hop off the line.  The dine-in patio is flanked with stylized palm tree columns, hinting back to Hans Hollein and John Nash before him.  A central oculus sits over the point-of-sale, with the iconic red standing-seam metal roof rendered as a hip.

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a mountain-side courtyard home

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This house is a line of three squares: a central tree-filled courtyard flanked by a garage/studio impluvium volume on one end, and a large, hip-roofed residence on the other.  The rafters of this roof extend to encapsulate a long porch, the majority of which is screened.  A spiral staircase descends to the bedrooms, which are located below.  The complex is imagined to be sited on a hillside, with the garage square nearly underground, and the residence looking out over the valley below.

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shingles, squares, and circles

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Let’s start with the detail this time, reading top to bottom: 1.) A shingled wall curves in to meet a stucco wall in a re-entrant corner.  Square windows are cut from this, mullioned into the four-square, with small, beveled squares around.  2.) This shingle wall is the second story with a colonnade below, the stucco is an otherwise blank wall, with only one tall window cutting through the middle and terminating in a dormer at the roof.  3.) This tall window only hints at the circular interior volume behind, one side a stair, the other an entry.  Other than that, no record of the two wall systems is traced on the interior, where only the radius of the curve exists.  4.) And just like that, we’re back at the detail again.

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